Social Network

5 11 2010

From the outset of Social Network you’ll identify you’re watching a movie that centers on the great virtues of Harvard.

Mark is dumped by his girlfriend and  in his misery  conjures  an idea. He needs an algorithm from his best friend, Eduardo, then BAM! they crash the Harvard Network system. They get the attention of people of means (if you don’t know what it is, ask a bourgeois) and they are signed up to do some work . In the process, things get lost in greed translation and the “hired” takes home the bacon. Standing in the shoulders of probable money-maker-giant, Mark acquaints himself to an equally worldly fellow who caused the fall of the music industry early 2K. Then a snowball ensues that resulted to facebook.com.

Chock-full of intelligence, humor, and pathos, David Fincher’s study of the young Mark Zucherburg during the conception of Facebook is a fascinating engagement. It features not one but two remarkable performances, that of Andrew Garfield and Justin Timberlake. They embody their characters and lay bare the motivations behind these prominent people; whom we can freely attribute to Zucherburg’s Facebook success. It allows viewers a glimpse into the inner social workings of the brainiest people of the I.T. era.

Social Network is a drama that effectively humanizes  the machine we call facebook.  It gives us a rationale of how Young Bill Gates Wannabees (aka nerds) act, survive and reign. With an intelligent script and tone of Harvard swagger, it slyly manages a wink and a nod at the audience every now and then. Given the depth of  Eisenberg (Mark Zuckerberg), Garfield (Eduardo Saverin) and Timberlake (Sean Parker, Napster Founder), the flesh that symbolizes a juggernaut that stomped on Friendster and MySpace gives its audience a feel of what it is to be living in the cusp of never-ending triumph.

It is a strong film that questions the morals of success and it’s bitter set backs … something we all can Like and Comment on.

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