Shattered

In a way, I need a change
From this burnout scene
Another time, another town
Another everything
But it’s always back to you

Stumble out, in the night
From the pouring rain
Made the block, sat and thought
There’s more I need
It’s always back to you

But I’m good without ya
Yeah, I’m good without you
Yeah, yeah, yeah

How many times can I break till I shatter?
Over the line can’t define what I’m after
I always turn the car around
Give me a break let me make my own pattern
All that it takes is some time but I’m shattered
I always turn the car around

I had no idea that the night
Would take so damn long

Took it out, on the street
While the rain still falls
Push me back to you

But I’m good without ya
Yeah, I’m good without you
Yeah, yeah, yeah

How many times can I break till I shatter?
Over the line can’t define what I’m after
I always turn the car around
Give me a break let me make my own pattern
All that it takes is some time but I’m shattered
I always turn the car around

Give it up, give it up, baby
Give it up, give it up, now
Now

How many times can I break till I shatter?
Over the line can’t define what I’m after
I always turn the car around
All that I feel is the realness I’m faking
Taking my time but it’s time that I’m wasting
Always turn the car around

How many times can I break till I shatter?
Over the line can’t define what I’m after
I always turn the car around

Don’t wanna turn that car around
I gotta turn this thing around

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Eclipse (Film)

It might not have been the strongest Twilight but it sure brought the hordes of fans out to support it.

Jacob and Edward are still dreamy (something that induced and dragged the drooling for so many girls for far too long) we are still in Forks and everyone still looks like a pin-up version as opposed to the book – it was supposed to be just a handful. Then there’s a tug of war between the wolves and the vampires and right smack in the middle is Bella, the dolt of a girl who can’t seem to get her decisions straight. And to make a trifecta of it all, the people around her would need to prepare for a huge mano-a-mano because Victoria is out for revenge. Suffice to say the good romance surrounds a bad heroine.

Essentially a love story, Eclipse predominately creeps into the egos of the female gender selling the idea that this type of whirlwind oh-the-universe-can-revolve-around-me story can be a tool to live on vicariously. I mean, who wouldn’t want an Edward or a Jacob? While I can’t remember how it was when I was crazy over the novels, I can say that it was fairly okay.

It might have been atrocious to most (and I was bordering on that) this indeed was far more acceptable than the first one. The colour was crisp and the musical scoring decent. Summarizing a 629-page young adult romance novel is a feat on its own but the movie was able to capture every important detail to carry non-readers to understanding.

I am still wishing that there’d be better acting from the main characters but I think that would be asking for too much. Instead, I just sat there like any good moviegoer and allowed Eclipse to progress in ways it can and wanted to.

You know what? The opening of the movie reminded me of the film The Ring; if you’ve seen both then you’ll catch my drift. The gimmickry overshot and failed instantaneously, I can only look away. Though the director can be credited for keeping it away from crashing the way the first director did, there really isn’t much material for him to work on.

If you ask me, New Moon still inched higher than this but hey, better than the first, yes?

For most it is forgettable, but for those who eat up the idea, this is going to be the best movie until Breaking Dawn. I trust there will never really be a middle ground.

Ratings:

 

Say You’re One Of Them

As the car pulled away with Maisha, our mourning attracted kids from the gangs. They circled the food, and I threw away the bottle and joined my family again. We struggled to stuff the food into our mouths, to stuff the bags back inside the shack, but the kids made off with the balloons and the cards.
I hid among a group of retreating kids and slipped away. I ran through traffic, scaled the road divider, and disappeared into Nairobi. My last memory of my family was of the twins burping and giggling.

Say You’re One Of Them is written by Nigerian Jesuit Priest, Uwem Akpan. It is a compilation of short-stories from five countries in Africa told from a child’s point of view. All five are faring through war, religious and tribe torn nations.

Truth be told: If you are picking up a book of short stories and want a light read, this book is not for you. If you like to read a book that includes children with happy endings, again, this is not for you. But for those who would like to persevere and triumph over disheartening stories, this will indubitably captivate you.

Although the narrators are children, it largely appeals to adults with its unmarked thought provoking variety that is both harrowing and heart wrenching.  Its bracing stylistics presents a nice interlude as compared to all the other books we usually read. It also displays the power of brutality and kindness, humanizing those who live through constant hostilities.

Though the voice of each story comes off as ponderous, Say You’re One Of Them is never watered down.  Seen with eyes that are too young to understand, it equally elevates the adverse inhumanities brought about by disagreements and greed. And at the same time it reminds us of the small defiance’s that make for big distinctions.

With such realistic characters, Akpan’s compelling, life affirming and tragic novel is masterfully told through remarkable range; something I can’t recommend highly enough.

Notes:

Say You’re One Of Them consists of the following short-stories:

An Ex-Mas Feast
Fattening For Gabon
What Language Is That?
Luxurious Hearses
My Parent’s Bedroom

Published by Little Brown Books

ISBN-10: 031611378 and/ or ISBN-13: 978-0316113786